This reminder email worked.

I opened, clicked, and made a purchase. But why was it effective? Let’s break down the reminder email and my subsequent behavior.

Recently, as I was scrolling through my emails one particular subject line caught my eye, “Reminder – Don’t Forget your Mileage Points are Expiring this October.” This subject piqued my interest enough that I felt compelled to open the email to see what it was all about. A few minutes later and a flight booked to Florida, I sat there and analyzed how this genius marketing strategy impacted my decision.

From name: It was from a brand name that I recognized. I previously purchased from this brand and I had opted into receiving their emails, so I trusted what they sent me.

Subject line: “Reminder – Don’t Forget your Mileage Points are Expiring this October.” Starting with the word “reminder” did just that, it reminded me I had something important to review. It also gave me a sense of urgency considering I had not done anything about it in the past, or else they would not have to send a reminder email. I knew I felt responsible for opening this since I was negligent in the past.

Email body: The body was simple, direct, and actionable. It was followed with a CTA that was direct and straightforward. It was clear, easy to click and it directed me towards searching for flights where I could redeem these mileage points.

Within a matter of minutes, my points were easily redeemed. Had I not received this reminder email, this flight would not have been possible and most likely my points would have expired. Between using the word “Reminder” and crafting a simple email with a strong call to action, this prompted me to take action.

Now I understand that not everyone has the same thought pattern as I do and that this tactic may not be effective for everyone. However, I do believe this strategy could be effective for some subscribers across many industries. For example, a reminder email could be sent to subscribers about upcoming sales, promotions, webinars, events, etc. When executed correctly, a reminder email could prompt subscribers to take action.

Reminder, test it with your subscriber list!

Dan

Author Dan

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